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Schedule

SCHEDULE

Friday, February 28, 2014

5:00-7:00pm
Registration
Sheraton Read House

7:00-8:00pm
Opening Reception
Carmike Majestic Cinema

8:00-10:00pm
Back to the Future screening
Q&A with Alan Silvestri
Carmike Majestic Cinema
Tickets are $15 for non-Festival attendees and available at the door only.

Saturday, March 1, 2014

9:00-9:45am
George S. Clinton presentation
Carmike Majestic Cinema

9:45-10:30am
Peter Golub presentation
Carmike Majestic Cinema

10:30-10:45am
Break
Carmike Majestic Cinema

10:45-11:30am
Alan Silvestri presentation
Carmike Majestic Cinema

11:30am-12:30pm
Panel discussion with film composers moderated by Doreen Ringer Ross
Carmike Majestic Cinema

1:00-3:00pm
Lunch on your own

3:00-5:30pm
Singin’ in the Rain Open Rehearsal
Tivoli Theatre

5:30-7:30pm
Dinner on your own

7:30-10:00pm
Singin’ in the Rain
Tivoli Theatre
Richard Kaufman, conductor
Tickets are available for non-Festival attendees by calling 423.267.8583 or online at www.chattanoogasymphony.org.

Sunday, March 2, 2014

10:00am-10:45pm
Film/Orchestra Collaboration Q&A with Richard Kaufman and John Goberman
Tivoli Theatre

11:00am-1:30pm
Hooray for Hollywood Open Rehearsal
Tivoli Theatre

1:30-3:00pm
Lunch on your own

3:00-5:30pm
Hooray for Hollywood with the Chattanooga Symphony & Opera
Tivoli Theatre
Bob Bernhardt, conductor
George S. Clinton, conductor
Peter Golub, conductor
Alan Silvestri, conductor
Tickets are available for non-Festival attendees by calling 423.267.8583 or online at www.chattanoogasymphony.org.

5:30-7:30pm
Closing Reception
Tivoli Center

Tickets

TICKETS

The Chattanooga International Film Music Festival registration is closed. Tickets are available to the Back to the Future movie at the door, as well as to the concerts Singin’ in the Rain and Hooray for Hollywood.

For questions or concert tickets, call 423.267.8583.

Download Order Form

Program

PROGRAM

Download Program (pdf)

Friday, February 28

8:00-10:00pm

Back to the Future Screening and Q&A

  • Carmike Majestic Cinema

This 1985 film featuring Michael J. Fox and Christopher Lloyd followed a teenager who is accidentally sent 30 years into the past in a time-traveling DeLorean invented by his friend, Dr. Emmett Brown, and must make sure his high-school-age parents unite in order to save his own existence.

Alan Silvestri, film music composer for the movie, will offer a Q&A session after the screening.

Saturday, March 1

9:00-9:45am

Musical Choices – Peter Golub

  • Carmike Majestic Cinema

Film music composer Peter Golub presents samples of his work and gives Festival participants a glimpse into a composer’s mind as he describes the choices he makes when composing for film.

9:45-10:30am

Where does the music come from? – George S. Clinton

  • Carmike Majestic Cinema

Film music composer George S. Clinton walks participants through his process of composing for film, from idea inception to final composition, while showing examples of his own work.

10:45-11:30am

Why? Where? What? A composer’s conversation with a film

  • Alan Silvestri
  • Carmike Majestic Cinema

Film music composer Alan Silvestri asks a film Why it wants music, Where it wants music, and What the music should be.

11:30am-12:30pm

Music and Film: The Creative Process – Panel Discussion

  • Carmike Majestic Cinema

Join Peter Golub, George S. Clinton, Richard Kaufman and Alan Silvestri for a panel discussion moderated by Doreen Ringer Ross. Through a roundtable discussion and Q&A with the audience, the panel will cover a wide range of topics dealing with the art of composing for film.

3:00-5:30pm

Singin’ in the Rain Open Rehearsal

  • Tivoli Theatre

Take a seat as the Chattanooga Symphony & Opera rehearses the evening’s film concert, Singin’ in the Rain, conducted by guest conductor Richard Kaufman.

7:30-9:30pm

Singin’ in the Rain with the Chattanooga Symphony & Opera

  • Tivoli Theatre
  • Richard Kaufman, conductor

Topping the American Film Institute’s list of 25 greatest Movie Musicals of all time, this film masterpiece comes to life with live orchestral accompaniment and award winning on-screen performances by Gene Kelly, Donald O’Connor, and Debbie Reynolds.

Sunday, March 2

10:00-10:45am

Film/Orchestra Collaboration Q&A with Richard Kaufman and John Goberman

  • Tivoli Theatre

Singin’ in the Rain Conductor Richard Kaufman and Producer John Goberman take your questions about how live orchestra accompaniment is combined on stage with film.

11:00am-1:30pm

Hooray for Hollywood Open Rehearsal

  • Tivoli Theatre

Take a seat as George S. Clinton, Peter Golub, Alan Silvestri, and Chattanooga Symphony & Opera Principal Pops Conductor Bob Bernhardt rehearse with the CSO for the afternoon performance of Hooray for Hollywood.

3:00-5:30pm

Hooray for Hollywood with the Chattanooga Symphony & Opera

  • Tivoli Theatre
  • Robert Bernhardt, conductor
  • George S. Clinton, conductor
  • Peter Golub, conductor
  • Alan Silvestri, conductor

The CSO’s Principal Pops Conductor Bob Bernhardt and Chattanooga International Film Music Festival Artistic Advisor George S. Clinton created a concert featuring works from some of Hollywood’s most iconic films. The first portion of the concert, conducted by Bernhardt, features old Hollywood with music from Ben Hur, Captain Blood, and King Kong. The second portion features Clinton conducting his suite from the Austin Powers films, Peter Golub conducts his score to the documentary These Amazing Shadows, and Alan Silvestri conducts his suite from the Back to the Future movies. The final portion ends with modern Hollywood music from films such as Batman, Lincoln, and Lord of the Rings.

Download Program (pdf)

Guest-Artists2

GUEST ARTISTS

Alan Silvestri

Alan Silvestri; featured film music composer

In over thirty years as a film composer, Alan Silvestri has blazed an innovative trail with his exciting and melodic scores, winning the applause of Hollywood and movie audiences the world over.

Born in Manhattan in 1950, Alan was first drawn to music at an early age. Beginning as a drummer, his love for instruments quickly grew to include the bassoon, clarinet, saxophone and guitar. Writing his own music and forming numerous bands during his early school days, his musical life would lead him to the Berklee College of Music in Boston where he was to enroll as a composition major.

Upon leaving Berklee, Alan ‘hit the road’ with Wayne Cochran and the C.C. Riders. As a guitarist in Cochran’s popular band, Alan toured America. Continuing to explore his love of music, he moved to Hollywood and the result was his first movie score with 1972’s “The Doberman Gang.”

He would score a number of small films during this period before breaking through as a television composer during the second season of the hit series “ChiPs.” During four years on the show, Alan’s talent for driving, energetic rhythms would help the motorcycle cops give chase. Silvestri’s talent for percussive melodies would particularly impress Robert Zemeckis, who gave the composer his breakthrough score in the action-comedy hit “Romancing the Stone.”

Both director and composer were suddenly propelled to a hugely successful collaboration that would include the “Back to the Future” series, “Who Framed Roger Rabbit,” the Oscar-winning “Forrest Gump” (for which Silvestri received an AcademyAward nomination for Best Score), “Contact,” “What Lies Beneath,” “Castaway”(for which he won a Grammy Award for Best Instrumental Composition), “The Polar Express” (whose song “Believe,” co-written with Glen Ballard, won a Grammy Awardand was nominated for an Academy Award), “Beowulf,” “A Christmas Carol,” and “Flight” which was released on November 2nd, 2012.

Through the years and over 100 scores, Alan has distinguished himself in many genres, from thrilling suspense (“Predator,” “The Abyss,” “Identity,” “G.I. Joe- The Rise of Cobra”), to galloping westerns (“Young Guns 2,” “The Quick and the Dead”), youthful fantasy (“Stuart Little,” “Lilo and Stitch,” “Night at the Museum,” ”Captain America” and “The Avengers”) rollicking comedy (“Father of the Bride”, “The Parent Trap,” “What Women Want”) and heartfelt drama (“The Perez Family” “Maid in Manhattan”). But whether composing orchestral action, or tender melodies, Alan Silvestri’s work has always been identifiable by its keen sense of melody and theme. Long time residents of California’s central coast, the Silvestri family has embarked on a new venture as the founders of Silvestri Vineyards. Their Chardonnay, Pinot Noir, and Syrah wines show that lovingly cultivated fruit has a music all its own. “There’s something about the elemental side of winemaking that appeals to me,” he says. “Both music making and wine making involve the blending of art and science. Just as each note brings it own voice to the melody, each vine brings it’s own unique personality to the wine. ”

Whether in his studio or the vineyard, Alan continues to find inspiration and passion for music, film and wine.

George Clinton

George S. Clinton; Artistic Advisor

George S. Clinton began his professional musical career as a songwriter, arranger, and session musician in Nashville, while earning degrees in music and drama at Middle Tennessee State University. The summer after graduation, George attended the Atlanta Pop Festival and, upon hearing Joe Cocker perform “With a Little Help from My Friends”, left his native Chattanooga, bound for Los Angeles and ready to rock and roll.

Clinton became a staff writer for Warner Brothers Music, with songs recorded by such artists as Michael Jackson, Joe Cocker, and Three Dog Night; continued arranging and session work; and, as a recording artist, did albums for MCA, Elektra, ABC, and Arista. The critically acclaimed George Clinton Band attracted the attention of a movie producer, giving George the opportunity to score his first film, Still Smokin’, and, later, Cheech& Chong’s The Corsican Brothers.

He developed his craft scoring “ninja” movies for Cannon Films, network and cable television movies and miniseries, writing for a wide range of genres and musical styles. The soulful, erotic jazz for Zalman King’s Showtime anthology Red Shoe Diaries developed quite a following, and brought more public awareness.

His musical inventiveness and versatility in both orchestral and popular idioms have allowed him to contribute memorable scores to such diverse films as the hit comedy Austin Powers: International Man of Mystery and its blockbuster sequels and the hit martial arts fantasy Mortal Kombat and its sequel. Other noteworthy projects include John Waters’s A Dirty Shame; Disney’s holiday hits The Santa Clause 2 and The Santa Clause 3; and the sexy thriller Wild Things.

Most recent projects include the Emmy Award-winning Bury My Heart At Wounded Knee, Hometown Glory, The Tooth Fairy, Extract, and Salvation Boulevard.

In addition, Clinton has written several concert works; three musicals; and is proud to serve as an advisor at the Sundance Composers Lab. He is a member of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences. Awards include Grammy and Emmy nominations, and 9 BMI Film Music Awards, including their highest honor, the Richard Kirk Career Achievement Award.

He recently was appointed the new Chair of the Film Scoring Department at the Berklee College of Music in Boston. A CSO board member, this marks the 5th time Mr. Clinton has conducted his “favorite orchestra” performing music from his film scores.

Peter Golub

Peter Golub; Advisory Council member, session participant, conductor

Born in New York into a musical family, Peter Golub began playing the piano when he was six. Alongside his interest in music, in high school he developed a passion for the theatre, forming a troupe with a group of classmates and directing and acting in adventurous plays (Pinter, Ionesco, Beckett). His interest in music and theatre led to his ongoing involvement in dramatic music as his career travels between film, theatre, and concert music.

He was an undergraduate at Bennington College, where he studied composition with Henry Brant, a pioneer in spatial music in the tradition of Charles Ives and a master orchestrator. His piano studies with Lionel Nowak led him both to traditional repertoire as well as 20th Century works. He continued his studies at the Yale School of Music where he studied composition with Toru Takemitsu and Jacob Druckman and earned a Doctorate. His work and friendship with Takemitsu, who in addition to his concert works was the composer of a large body of film work, was pivotal in his development and continues to be an inspiration.

Combining his interest in traditional and contemporary classical music, jazz and opera with his ongoing preoccupation with drama, Golub’s primary focus in the last ten years has been on film music. He recently co-composed, with James Newton Howard, the music for The Great Debaters, directed by Denzel Washington and starring Washington and Forest Whitaker. He scored Frozen River, directed by Courtney Hunt, and winner of Jury Award for Best Film at the 2008 Sundance Film Festival. The Laramie Project, directed by Moises Kaufman for HBO, features a score performed by The St. Luke’s Orchestra. He composed music for the documentaries Wordplay (starring Will Shortz, Bill Clinton and Jon Stewart) andI.O.U.S.A., both directed by Patrick Creadon and both shown at the Sundance Film Festival. His score for Stolen, directed by Rebecca Dreyfus, was awarded Best Music at the 2003 Avignon Film Festival. He also scored American Gun, directed by AricAvelino and starring Forest Whitaker, Marcia Gay Harden and Donald Sutherland and Sublime, directed by Tony Krantz, starring Thomas Cavanagh. (See the Film page for complete listing, or visit the Internet Movie Database.)

Golub’s recent concert works include Dark Carols for Chorus and Orchestra (with text by Philip Littell, recorded on the ECM label); Threaded Dances for flute and piano; Three Interludes for guitar (recorded on Gasparao Records by Robert Phelps); Trio for viola, bass and piano; and A Schubert Journey for cello and marimba. His music has been performed by Tashi, The Brooklyn Philharmonic, The Jubal Trio, and numerous chamber groups and soloists. He has composed four ballet scores in collaboration with noted choreographer Peter Anastos: The Lost World, commissioned by Edward Villella for the Miami City Ballet; The Gilded Bat (story and designs by Edward Gorey, for Ballet West; performed at the Kennedy Center); Trianon (for the Atlanta Ballet); and Straight Through the Heart (for the Milwaukee Ballet).

Doreen Ringer Ross

Doreen Ringer Ross; Advisory Council member, panel moderator

Doreen Ringer-Ross, VP Film/TV for BMI · Los Angeles, California, oversees all activity serving film and television composers. Prior to BMI, Ringer Ross held artist development positions at A&M Records, ABC Records and MCA Records, and also worked in television production as a producer for a wide array of television programs.

Established many programs including the Sundance Institute’s Composer’s Lab and the BMI Film/TV Composers Conducting Workshop. Oversees BMI’s film scoring scholarships at USC, UCLA, and Berklee College of Music, and sponsorship involvement with the Sundance Film Festival, the IFP Rough Cut Lab and the IFP Film Conference, the Los Angeles Film Festival, the SXSW Film & Interactive Festival, the Don’t Knock The Rock Film and Music Festival, and the Woodstock Film Festival.

Vice Chair of the Board, Mr. Holland’s Opus Foundation; Peabody Awards Board member, Music Advisory Board member at UCLA; Business Advisory Board of the Young Musicians Foundation; Advisory Board of the American Youth Symphony; the National Academy of Recording Arts & Sciences; GRAMMY Museum Education Advisory Committee; Advisory Board for the IFP Rough Cut Lab; board member of The World Soundtrack Academy, board member of the Don’t Knock The Rock Film and Music Festival; Advisory Board for The Hollywood Film Festival, member of the Academy of Television Arts & Sciences; the Society of Composers and Lyricists; Film Independent, the California Copyright Conference; the National Academy of Songwriters; Women In Film; and AFI.

Transportation

DIRECTIONS & PARKING

All activities are held in downtown Chattanooga along Broad Street.

Registration is at the Sheraton Read House, as well as overnight accomodations for those who make reservations. The Sheraton Read House is located at 827 Broad Street in downtown Chattanooga. Parking for the Read House includes valet, street parking, and a garage located on Chestnut Street.

The Majestic Theatre is located at 311 Broad Street. There is a FREE shuttle that travels along Broad Street and can take Festival attendees from the Sheraton Read House to the Majestic, as well as the Tivoli Theatre. Parking available will be street parking and a parking garage located on 3rd Street between Chestnut and Broad Street.

The Tivoli Theatre is located at 709 Broad Street. Street parking may be available, or a parking garage located on 7th between Chestnut and Broad Street.

Lodging

LODGING

Get Google Map Directions

Google Map Directions

The Chattanooga International Film Music Festival’s host hotel is:

Sheraton Read House
827 Broad Street
Chattanooga, TN 37402.

Group rates are no longer available, but please contact the Sheraton Read House if you require accomodations. Call 866.837.4193.